The video interview thread

Here we discuss topics related to Jake E Lee.

Moderator: skezza

Killer of Giants
Posts: 592
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 5:00 pm
Location: france

The video interview thread

Postby Fakeblue » Sat Jul 30, 2011 10:50 am

Ok, I just thought it would be nice to collect all videos interviews with Jake in one thread. I found the following one with Badlands including Ray & Jake. Sorry if it was posted before. I really enjoyed it cause it gave me the opportunity to hear Jake's voice for the first time. Plus he's got this leather bracelet on his right wrist that looks so good on him. When he leans his head forward, his hair are falling on his shoulder, and that reminds me a lot of live moments. God I'd love to find a video interview back in Ozzy's days.

Rock 'N' Roll Heaven 1989

Secret Loser
Posts: 150
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 5:00 pm
Location: Espana

Re: The video interview thread

Postby Fedaykin » Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:11 am

Fakeblue wrote:Ok, I just thought it would be nice to collect all videos interviews with Jake in one thread. I found the following one with Badlands including Ray & Jake. Sorry if it was posted before. I really enjoyed it cause it gave me the opportunity to hear Jake's voice for the first time. Plus he's got this leather bracelet on his right wrist that looks so good on him. When he leans his head forward, his hair are falling on his shoulder, and that reminds me a lot of live moments. God I'd love to find a video interview back in Ozzy's days.

Rock 'N' Roll Heaven 1989
I don't think he did many television or radio interviews with Ozzy, although he did some print ones. He never really seemed to go for the limelight, although he knew what to do with it live as he had terrific stage presence. I remember seeing him and Ray co-host MTV when Jake's leg was in a cast or something in '89. I came home from school that day and turned on the tube and there was Jake saying, "Stay tuned for, Yo, MTV raps" like he didn't give a damn, which was hella cool. He's too real for such a fake business, and I think that may be what ticked off Castillo and Soussan, because they wanted to party and he wasn't into it. Unfortunately, it was Phil who left Ozzy of his own accord, while Jake was fired, which sucks. Can you imagine how much better a follow up to TUS would have been with Jake on it?
“My parents wanted me to be the next Van Cliburn, but I wanted to be the next Van Halen.”

Killer of Giants
Posts: 592
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 5:00 pm
Location: france

Re: The video interview thread

Postby Fakeblue » Tue Aug 02, 2011 2:49 am

I've been trying for years to imagine what TUS follow would have been with Jake........and yeah....phil soussan giving inspiration for more 'Shot In The Dark' tainted songs. I'd be curious to know what Jake 'hidden songs' were back then, I mean, I believe musicians sometimes have songs they don't want to make official because they think they're not worthy but they actually are damn good. If I was asked to name most typical Jake writing I would mention Bark At The Moon, Never Know Why, Never and Fool Like You. These songs are written in the same spirit but if you look at pieces like 'Waiting For Darkness', 'Spiders' or 'You're No Different' it really makes you wonder how much have been left behind ... :(

Secret Loser
Posts: 150
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 5:00 pm
Location: Espana

Re: The video interview thread

Postby Fedaykin » Tue Aug 02, 2011 3:45 am

Fakeblue wrote:I've been trying for years to imagine what TUS follow would have been with Jake........and yeah....phil soussan giving inspiration for more 'Shot In The Dark' tainted songs. I'd be curious to know what Jake 'hidden songs' were back then, I mean, I believe musicians sometimes have songs they don't want to make official because they think they're not worthy but they actually are damn good. If I was asked to name most typical Jake writing I would mention Bark At The Moon, Never Know Why, Never and Fool Like You. These songs are written in the same spirit but if you look at pieces like 'Waiting For Darkness', 'Spiders' or 'You're No Different' it really makes you wonder how much have been left behind ... :(
While I've heard tracks like One Up the B-Side and Spiders from BATM, I have yet to hear any unreleased or B-Sides from TUS. Had Jake stayed with Ozzy for another tour, I think it would have been his last, and he would then have gone on to form his own band, maybe not Badlands, but something just as good. But I think Jake was getting tired of playing Ozzy music, because no matter what he did, it had to fit into that box. I've head interviews where Jake said that TUS was an extremely stressful album to record, and that he did not get along with the producer, Ron Nevison who himself was determined to make Ozzy as commercially successful as possible, and songs like SITD where exactly what they were looking for. Remember that metal was getting poppy at the time since it had come a long way by 1986. During the recording of TUS, Jake felt marginalized. He wanted to try various amp settings, and Nevison wanted to go with one sound since it was easier to mix. That is why you hear this very distorted, but not very loud guitar sound on the album. I believe Jake was using a Rat pedal, since I'd heard him mention it, and I know how these sound. He also used EVs like he had on BATM. For the most part his tone is excellent on TUS, better than on BATM; the only problem I have with TUS, as do Jake and others, is that it was not heavy like BATM. Remember that Crue had gone for a lighter, poppy sound for Theatre which TUS had come out on the heels of, and that was the most successful metal release of '85, and the tour as well. Ozzy was under pressure, and Jake, being an underling, was going to feel the brunt of it. So although things looked hunky dory to us kids (at the time I was 12 and just started to play guitar), behind the curtain things were not always as we would believe them to be. I'd read an interview with Jake and Warren Di Martini from one of the guitar mags in early '87, right when Jake had finished TUS tour and Warren was about to embark on the Dancing Undercover tour (which I regret not seeing live as well!) and in it Warren mentioned how Jake was so pissed that he couldn't get the sound right during sound-check at The Forum in Los Angeles that he threw his guitar across the stage. Jake had also mentioned that Ozzy was wonderful sober, but Godzilla drunk. Whether or not Ozzy gave the node to firing Jake, the call had a lot more to do with Sharon taking the advice to fire him from Castillo and Soussan than any deep decision making on Ozzy's part. I always got the feeling Ozzy regretted firing Jake, since he tried to hire him again after Zakk left the first time in '95 or so, before he hired Joe Holmes. But like the almost-reunion of Roth and VH in '96, this was one of those things not meant to happen in the 90s, as nothing happened for metal in the 90s, at least not in the USA. Maybe they happened this last decade (VH with Roth, sans Michael Anthony), the rebirth of Iron Maiden, who's zombie mascot is served as an omen for a band forever undead, a band forever to rock. Music is a tough business to be in on a good day, never mind a bad one. What looked like glory to us fans, was just tinsel to Jake. I remember an interview he did in which he told the interviewer, regarding the first Bandlands album, "In a million years, who's gonna care? It's just a piece of plastic." While that's an earthy attitude to some, it's not the kind of attitude that people like to see in the music biz. That attitude in more punk than rock, a genre of music in which there is no perfection in perfection, but only imperfection. I think Jake grew up fast in the business, while people around him didn't want to. He wanted great success with Badlands, but he would settle for some damn good albums. Why Badlands never too off, I'll never know. I think they are one of the greatest bands of all time. Besides the death of Ray, which cannot be overlooked, perhaps it was because they were expected to be poseurs like other hard rock bands of the day, and they were perhaps too rigid, too real. Coverdale offered Jake a gig with Whitesnake after Ozzy, but again, he would have had to play someone else's music, and had very little musical freedom. Whitesnake was all about commercial success, and I think Jake wanted something more than just that, because commercial success, when it isn't really your commercial, is like a successful ad campaign for mouse, especially in the big hair, little substance world of commercial hard rock as it was in the 80s: it means little to nothing. The money is rarely all it's cracked up to be. Jake has integrity, and when it comes down to it, that's why we are fans. It takes integrity to master an instrument like he did, and integrity to really go for your own style and not sound like anyone else. Warren said, in that interview he did with Jake in '87, that "you can always tell it's Jake because of the sound the pick makes when it hits the string." How many players can you say that about? He has true style, a great feel, great vibrato, and an appreciation for terrific tones that only compliment his style. I'd have less trouble picking the sound of Jake out than I would Van Halen, because while a lot of players sound like Eddie, few can even begin to sound like Jake. He's the man.
“My parents wanted me to be the next Van Cliburn, but I wanted to be the next Van Halen.”

Ultimate Sinner
User avatar
Posts: 119
Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2011 1:43 pm
Location: Pfäffikon , Gsteig, Ötikon- CH

Re: The video interview thread

Postby Allfyve » Tue Aug 02, 2011 8:26 am

Fedaykin wrote:
While I've heard tracks like One Up the B-Side and Spiders from BATM, I have yet to hear any unreleased or B-Sides from TUS. Had Jake stayed with Ozzy for another tour, I think it would have been his last, and he would then have gone on to form his own band, maybe not Badlands, but something just as good. But I think Jake was getting tired of playing Ozzy music, because no matter what he did, it had to fit into that box. I've head interviews where Jake said that TUS was an extremely stressful album to record, and that he did not get along with the producer, Ron Nevison who himself was determined to make Ozzy as commercially successful as possible, and songs like SITD where exactly what they were looking for. Remember that metal was getting poppy at the time since it had come a long way by 1986. During the recording of TUS, Jake felt marginalized. He wanted to try various amp settings, and Nevison wanted to go with one sound since it was easier to mix. That is why you hear this very distorted, but not very loud guitar sound on the album. I believe Jake was using a Rat pedal, since I'd heard him mention it, and I know how these sound. He also used EVs like he had on BATM. For the most part his tone is excellent on TUS, better than on BATM; the only problem I have with TUS, as do Jake and others, is that it was not heavy like BATM. Remember that Crue had gone for a lighter, poppy sound for Theatre which TUS had come out on the heels of, and that was the most successful metal release of '85, and the tour as well. Ozzy was under pressure, and Jake, being an underling, was going to feel the brunt of it. So although things looked hunky dory to us kids (at the time I was 12 and just started to play guitar), behind the curtain things were not always as we would believe them to be. I'd read an interview with Jake and Warren Di Martini from one of the guitar mags in early '87, right when Jake had finished TUS tour and Warren was about to embark on the Dancing Undercover tour (which I regret not seeing live as well!) and in it Warren mentioned how Jake was so pissed that he couldn't get the sound right during sound-check at The Forum in Los Angeles that he threw his guitar across the stage. Jake had also mentioned that Ozzy was wonderful sober, but Godzilla drunk. Whether or not Ozzy gave the node to firing Jake, the call had a lot more to do with Sharon taking the advice to fire him from Castillo and Soussan than any deep decision making on Ozzy's part. I always got the feeling Ozzy regretted firing Jake, since he tried to hire him again after Zakk left the first time in '95 or so, before he hired Joe Holmes. But like the almost-reunion of Roth and VH in '96, this was one of those things not meant to happen in the 90s, as nothing happened for metal in the 90s, at least not in the USA. Maybe they happened this last decade (VH with Roth, sans Michael Anthony), the rebirth of Iron Maiden, who's zombie mascot is served as an omen for a band forever undead, a band forever to rock. Music is a tough business to be in on a good day, never mind a bad one. What looked like glory to us fans, was just tinsel to Jake. I remember an interview he did in which he told the interviewer, regarding the first Bandlands album, "In a million years, who's gonna care? It's just a piece of plastic." While that's an earthy attitude to some, it's not the kind of attitude that people like to see in the music biz. That attitude in more punk than rock, a genre of music in which there is no perfection in perfection, but only imperfection. I think Jake grew up fast in the business, while people around him didn't want to. He wanted great success with Badlands, but he would settle for some damn good albums. Why Badlands never too off, I'll never know. I think they are one of the greatest bands of all time. Besides the death of Ray, which cannot be overlooked, perhaps it was because they were expected to be poseurs like other hard rock bands of the day, and they were perhaps too rigid, too real. Coverdale offered Jake a gig with Whitesnake after Ozzy, but again, he would have had to play someone else's music, and had very little musical freedom. Whitesnake was all about commercial success, and I think Jake wanted something more than just that, because commercial success, when it isn't really your commercial, is like a successful ad campaign for mouse, especially in the big hair, little substance world of commercial hard rock as it was in the 80s: it means little to nothing. The money is rarely all it's cracked up to be. Jake has integrity, and when it comes down to it, that's why we are fans. It takes integrity to master an instrument like he did, and integrity to really go for your own style and not sound like anyone else. Warren said, in that interview he did with Jake in '87, that "you can always tell it's Jake because of the sound the pick makes when it hits the string." How many players can you say that about? He has true style, a great feel, great vibrato, and an appreciation for terrific tones that only compliment his style. I'd have less trouble picking the sound of Jake out than I would Van Halen, because while a lot of players sound like Eddie, few can even begin to sound like Jake. He's the man.[/quote]


THANKS FOR SOME REALLY GREAT INFO i'm gonna copy it
:!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!:

Killer of Giants
Posts: 592
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 5:00 pm
Location: france

Re: The video interview thread

Postby Fakeblue » Mon Aug 08, 2011 12:17 pm

gee man you wrote a book here.
I thougth i knew a bit about mr Lee life, and I realize I'm a complete ignorant compared to an expert like you.

Almost daunty to reply to this great long answer. Well, there are two things I don't completely agree with though:

1 - I'm not sure Ozzy ever had regrets from firing our Ninja Guitar Hero.

why ? Because in a video like 'Don't Blame Me', Ozzy talks about all the guitarists he worked with , talk about their lifes, personalities and what memory he will keep of them.......but he doesn't say a word about Jake ! Like he thinks of him has a ghost. :(

2 - I'm not sure Jake ever really blossomed as a guitar player.

why ? shuffle ten good guitar solos on a tape and include a Jake solo among them. Take a music fan, have him listen to the tape and ask him to name which solo is Jake's. The guy won't be able to do it. Do the same experience with an Ace Freley solo, and the guy recognizes Ace. The guy would also recognize Marty Friedman, Slash, Randy Rhoads...people who really have a signature, something that leaves a mark in your mind. Jake was once interviewed by a guitar mag about Zakk Wilde, and he said 'that guy has done a terrific job, much better than me'. That was a fantastic proof of modesty from Jake. Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't be here if I didn't like Jake. I never got Badlands though, neither did I with Wicked Alliance but what Jake did with Ozzy is a miracle to my ears and my mind. Perhaps if Jake went a bit farther in that particular lyrical metal style, he would have grown as big as George Lynch.

Secret Loser
Posts: 150
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 5:00 pm
Location: Espana

Re: The video interview thread

Postby Fedaykin » Mon Aug 08, 2011 7:24 pm

Fakeblue wrote:gee man you wrote a book here.
I thougth i knew a bit about mr Lee life, and I realize I'm a complete ignorant compared to an expert like you.

Almost daunty to reply to this great long answer. Well, there are two things I don't completely agree with though:

1 - I'm not sure Ozzy ever had regrets from firing our Ninja Guitar Hero.

why ? Because in a video like 'Don't Blame Me', Ozzy talks about all the guitarists he worked with , talk about their lifes, personalities and what memory he will keep of them.......but he doesn't say a word about Jake ! Like he thinks of him has a ghost. :(

2 - I'm not sure Jake ever really blossomed as a guitar player.

why ? shuffle ten good guitar solos on a tape and include a Jake solo among them. Take a music fan, have him listen to the tape and ask him to name which solo is Jake's. The guy won't be able to do it. Do the same experience with an Ace Freley solo, and the guy recognizes Ace. The guy would also recognize Marty Friedman, Slash, Randy Rhoads...people who really have a signature, something that leaves a mark in your mind. Jake was once interviewed by a guitar mag about Zakk Wilde, and he said 'that guy has done a terrific job, much better than me'. That was a fantastic proof of modesty from Jake. Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't be here if I didn't like Jake. I never got Badlands though, neither did I with Wicked Alliance but what Jake did with Ozzy is a miracle to my ears and my mind. Perhaps if Jake went a bit farther in that particular lyrical metal style, he would have grown as big as George Lynch.
The fact is, any player who came after Randy played in his shadow, and it's an awesome shadow. So far as Ozzy regretting that he fired Jake, I think whatever regret he may have had was quickly replaced by his joy at having hired Zakk, who worked with him longer than any other musician and in a way was a real draw to his shows. While Randy left big footprints, and Jake certainly filled them, Jake had to deal with rabid Randy fans who never gave him the respect he deserved. Zakk, on the other hand, even though much was expected of him, had more time to prove himself. I know that in the mid 90s, after Zakk had left for a short hiatus, Ozzy tried to re-hire Jake, and for whatever reason this didn't happen. Joe Holmes was terrific, though.
As far as Jake never blossoming as a player, I think given his development between BATM and TUS, I'd saw that presumption is false. Jake developed incredibly as a player by TUS. On the other hand, I can't say the same about Zakk. Of all the players you mentioned, and how distinctive they sound, only Jake sounds like Jake at any speed. Slash does not sound like Slash without a wah-wah peddle, Marty Friedman only sounds like Marty Friedman when he plays at high speed, and although there is a Randy style, too many players have it, including Chris Holmes of W.A.S.P. It's hard to sound like Jake because his style so intrinsic, such a part of him, that all you can do is learn his solos. His view of the guitar is so unconventional that it takes a whole different avenue of musical thought. I feel that with Ozzy he was playing in a box, and even though many did not get Badlands, he was doing a lot of catch-up with that band, playing what the kind of music he grew up with and taking it further. Keep in mind that it was not only Ozzy that limited what he would play, but metal in general. With Ratt and Rough Cutt he played the kind of music that was commercially viable at the time. While I would not go so far as to suggest he got no enjoyment out of it metal, Badlands gave him a chance to play what he wanted to. On the other hand, Wicked Alliance was Jake's attempt at a return to metal at a time in which the genre had changed so much, and I'm not a fan of Mandy Lion. I think AFPM is a terrific instrumental album, but had Jake released it in the 80s it would have left may of his fans cold. It would have been way too psychedelic for a modern metal audience. I would say one solo that epitomizes Jake's growth as a player on TUS is the outro solo for Fool Like You. It simply has so much style and fire that sets it apart from most solos at the time. While other players only wanted to show how fast they could shred, Jake came from a much more mature place as a player. His work is deeply felt. He let's the guitar sing. He appreciates a good tone. He's golden.
“My parents wanted me to be the next Van Cliburn, but I wanted to be the next Van Halen.”

All Access Member
Posts: 308
Joined: Wed May 23, 2007 7:46 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: The video interview thread

Postby tedeeoo » Tue Aug 09, 2011 8:51 am

As much as I love Jake's work with Ozzy, it just doesn't compare to Badlands, especially Voodoo Highway. There is so much guitar on that record and the songwriting to me is just killer. To me, Badlands was headed in more of a 70's Aerosmith type vibe but maybe a little bit more raw. They are not that much different than a group like Black Stone Cherry, except that Badlands had a much better guitar player and singer. As far as Jake, I can pick his playing out anywhere, but then again I'm a guitar player and Jake was far and away my biggest influence growing up.

I never cared for Wicked Alliance much mainly because I couldn't stand to listen to Mandy's vocals. He seems like a cool guy, just not my cup of tea as a singer.


fakeblue I do understand where you're coming from, alot of people prefer Jake with Ozzy, that's cool to, that's where I got turned on to him. I think in some ways Jake is much bigger than George, mainly because he just kind of dissappeared and also due to the fact that alot of George's stuff sounds really similar. He (George) is a great guitar player, but he is very predictable. That being said, I absolutely love his solo on "Heaven Sent", that's George at his best!!!! One thing you can't question about George is his work ethic, he has stayed out there, even when his style of music has not been the most popular, there is alot to be said for that.

Killer of Giants
User avatar
Posts: 2138
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 5:00 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: The video interview thread

Postby MetalHead » Sun Aug 14, 2011 2:47 pm

Fedaykin wrote: lash does not sound like Slash without a wah-wah peddle, Marty Friedman only sounds like Marty Friedman when he plays at high speed


are you kidding me? although Slash uses a wah on occasion it's not exactly
his signature sound, and you only recognize Marty Friedman at high-speed?
Did you ever hear the guy play at all? All those quirky bends and little
nuances he draws from japanese Enka music? Tell me one other player
that does that and I'll shut up.

For reference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQzF6yEwK9k
"Spend less time chasing tones and more time just playing music." - Marty Friedman

Secret Loser
Posts: 150
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 5:00 pm
Location: Espana

Re: The video interview thread

Postby Fedaykin » Sun Aug 14, 2011 5:51 pm

MetalHead wrote:
Fedaykin wrote: lash does not sound like Slash without a wah-wah peddle, Marty Friedman only sounds like Marty Friedman when he plays at high speed


are you kidding me? although Slash uses a wah on occasion it's not exactly
his signature sound, and you only recognize Marty Friedman at high-speed?
Did you ever hear the guy play at all? All those quirky bends and little
nuances he draws from japanese Enka music? Tell me one other player
that does that and I'll shut up.

For reference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQzF6yEwK9k

Slash is a great player, and so is Marty. I'm not saying they don't have their own styles; I'm only saying their styles are not as distinctive as Jake's style. There are thousands of players who can do what Marty does, and yet only Jake sounds like Jake. It is more than technique, it is his feeling for the guitar. Slash has a lot of feeling as well, only his style is more defined by using the wah than not using the wah. Jake's style is not effects dependent. And Marty is wonderful. I agree. I would rather listen to Marty than a thousand other shredders. I just prefer Jake's style. Maybe it's just a matter of taste we are talking about. My taste is not better than yours, nor yours than mine. Hey, I can't play anything like Jake, Marty or Slash! But regarding slash, one thing I have noticed is that since Use Your Illusion he has used the wah too much for my liking. (If you're getting the impression I don't like wah peddles that much, you're right!). I've never owned a wah peddle, and I think that says it all right there. I know Jake has used one, but not so much with Ozzy. Wahs started to come back into popularity in the mid-eighties. I hardly saw any used in the L.A. club scene till the late eighties because they were brought back into popularity by Kirk and Slash. Most shredders would just try to sound like George or Yngwie in those days, with modded Marshalls and racks and Floyd machines. It all got more and more outrageous. It would have been a treat to see Marty in the middle of all that because the man does posses substance. I don't think he uses a whammy, or at least I've never seen him use one. Most shredders in those days were just GIT hacks. They all seemed to wear their guitars way up on their chests like assault rifles and were just as musical. When I saw Paul Gilbert with Racer X at the Country Club in Van Nuys in '88 I thought, "Aw hell, now that's enough already!" And that drew me more to Jake's style, and Michael Shenker, who, even though his tasteful use of the wah influenced Slash, used it a lot less than Slash. But Yes, Marty has developed and grown as a player over the years. I just honestly don't have an ear for his style, or Slash's.
“My parents wanted me to be the next Van Cliburn, but I wanted to be the next Van Halen.”

Killer of Giants
User avatar
Posts: 2138
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 5:00 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: The video interview thread

Postby MetalHead » Mon Aug 15, 2011 1:48 am

Fedaykin wrote:There are thousands of players who can do what Marty does

if you're talking about the speed thing, then yes.
Otherwise, no. I never heard one single player that draws influence
from eastern music that heavily.

Fedaykin wrote:Slash has a lot of feeling as well, only his style is more defined by using the wah than not using the wah.


I can only think of the second solo in Sweet Child as an instance for
wah using.

Fedaykin wrote:and Michael Shenker, who, even though his tasteful use of the wah influenced Slash, used it a lot less than Slash.


huh? Michael had his wah on all the time. More than a boost for solos
though, but still on all the time ;)
"Spend less time chasing tones and more time just playing music." - Marty Friedman

All Access Member
User avatar
Posts: 428
Joined: Thu May 24, 2007 10:08 am
Location: Michigan

Re: The video interview thread

Postby macheted01 » Sat Aug 20, 2011 4:49 pm

I've been a big Michael Schenker fan for a long time, going back to Assault Attack. I believe his wah was like a part of his tone. Pretty much on all the time. Actually just ordered the Enless Jam discs and looking forward to getting them.

Return to All things Jake E Lee...

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests